A city completely submerged by the sea 650 years ago has finally been found

City entirely engulfed by the seas finally found after centuries

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The 13th century town had more than 100 houses and a collection of wharves and warehouses along the coastline. It had become a thriving coastal town by 1299.
  • Many refer to the city as Britain’s lost Atlantis because no one was able to see it for over 650 years.
  • Many refer to the city as Britain’s lost Atlantis because no one was able to see it for over 650 years.

An old city that was entirely swallowed up by the seas centuries ago has been found after decades of searching

Ravenser Odd was a medieval port town also called Ravensrodd. Located in East Yorkshire, it was considered more important than Hull.

It was once an important stopover for fishing boats and freighters. The 13th century town had more than 100 houses and a collection of wharves and warehouses along the coastline. It had become a thriving coastal town by 1299.

Unfortunately, it was swept out to sea in the mid-1300s and remained underwater for centuries.

Many refer to the city as Britain’s lost Atlantis because no one was able to see it for over 650 years.

Scientists had been trying to locate the city for years. But a recent search closer to shore discovered rocks and stones a few meters below the surface of the water, according to a report from Mirror.co.uk.

Experts said the city remained unknown for centuries as previous scientists searched for it in the wrong places.

The most likely site for Ravenser Odd was generally believed to be about a mile off the Yorkshire coast.

But when a new field of scientists pushed their search closer to shore, they found the rocks and stones. Experts say the discovery may be as legendary as the discovery of Pompeii.

“It’s fascinating, exciting, exhilarating. The exact location of this medieval town has never been pinpointed,” Professor Dan Parsons, a geoscientist at the University of Hull, told The Sun.

“We now have the tools and the technology to go out there and locate it once and for all.” he added.

The team led by Parsons now hopes to find the town’s footprint. Once they find the foundations, the harbor and the sea walls, they will map the place and create a 3D map.

“Finding it, after so long, will be the completion of a lifetime’s work. I’m blown away by it all,” said Phil Mathison, who has dedicated 25 years of his life to searching for the city.